2019 on pace to have more school shootings than days in the year

Alexis Holmes, Correspondent

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So far in 2019 there have been twenty-two shootings at schools in the United States, where somebody ended up hurt or killed. They have occurred across the country, from Georgia to California, at elementary, middle and high schools, as well as colleges, with victims ranging from students to faculty to younger children.

 

Since there’s no single definition for what qualifies as a faculty shooting, CNN set the subsequent parameters. The shooting should involve a minimum of one person being shot – not including the shooter – and the shooting should occur on facility’s property, which has however been restricted to, buildings, athletic fields, parking lots or garages, stadiums and buses. They have enclosed accidental discharge of a gun as long because the first two parameters are met, except in instances wherever the only shooter is enforcement or a security officer.

 

They have also enclosed injuries sustained from BB guns, since the patron Product Safety Commission has known them as probably fatal.

 

On July 11 in Hartford, Connecticut, a man about 34 years old was riding his bike through a Bulkeley High School automobile parking space then he was shot moments later. He ended up dying from his injuries and the loss of blood.

 

Also, on July 2 in Anchorage, Alaska, a 22-year-old shot a young teenager in the courtyard of Williwaw School when a fight broke out among a bunch of students, and the authorities had to get deeply involved. The teenager shot was transported to the hospital with severe injuries, but wound up surviving.

 

Another shooting was in play on July 1 in New York involving a 13-year-old boy who was shot directly in the chest on a playground He was transported to the hospital in serious, however stable, condition. The young boy was put into a medical coma for two months because the doctors were afraid because his heart wasn’t very stable from the bullet being removed.

 

So far in 2019, the number of shootings at schools in the U.S. has already reached 366, as of November 14, according to the Gun Violence Archive’s tally.

 

According to an article on CBS News, “The number of mass shootings across the U.S. thus far in 2019 has outpaced the number of days this year, according to a gun violence research group. This puts 2019 on pace to be the first year since 2016 with an average of more than one mass shooting a day. As of November 17, which is the 321st day of the year, there have been 369 mass shootings in the U.S., according to data from the nonprofit Gun Violence Archive (GVA), which tracks every mass shooting in the country. Twenty-eight of those shootings were mass murders.  The GVA defines a mass shooting as any incident in which at least four people are shot, excluding the shooter. The group also tracks mass murders as defined by the FBI — incidents in which at least four people are killed. There have been 28 mass murders so far in 2019. The FBI does not have a formal definition of a mass shooting. The toll of 369 mass shootings includes several high-profile attacks, two of which happened within 24 hours of each other.”

 

Other shootings this year included a 15-year-old in Flint, Michigan after a fight broke out on school property, one in Chicago when a 25-year-old man was playing basketball outside of a school, and one at a spring sporting event in Florida, as well.

 

One commonality is that there are no commonalities between the shooters – sometimes, the shooter is a student, sometimes, it’s someone completely random that has nothing to do with the institution. The shooters also range in age from school age to adulthood.

 

One recent shooting occurred at a high school football playoff game in New Jersey where gunshots erupted during the middle of a game.

 

It’s kind of sad when there’s more school shootings within the confines of a calendar year over actual days in the year.

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